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High blood pressure associated with increased cardiovascular disease
Written by NetDoc.com Medical News Feed   

CHICAGO—Nearly three-fourths of American adults with conditions such as coronary heart disease, stroke, diabetes or others that raise their risk for cardiovascular complications also have hypertension (high ), according to a report in the December 10/24 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Although 75 percent of these individuals are being treated for hypertension, only one-third to one-half are reaching blood pressure goals.

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Blood pressure control remains a problem in the United States and around the world, according to background information in the article. “Recent estimates indicate little change in the prevalence of hypertension, and, although there seem to be some recent improvements in treatment and control rates, hypertension in many persons remains inadequately controlled,” the authors write.

Nathan D. Wong, Ph.D., of the University of California, Irvine, and colleagues analyzed data from adults participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, a nationally representative survey conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 2003 and 2004, 4,646 adults provided demographic and socioeconomic information and underwent laboratory and physiological testing (including blood pressure measurements).

A total of 1,671 (31.4 percent) of the participants had hypertension, defined as a systolic (top number) blood pressure of at least 140 milligrams of mercury (130 milligrams of mercury in those with diabetes or chronic kidney disease) or a diastolic (bottom number) blood pressure of at least 90 milligrams of mercury (80 milligrams of mercury in those with diabetes or chronic kidney disease), or as reporting use of a blood pressure–lowering medication. The condition was more common in older and black adults. A total of 68.5 percent of those with hypertension were being treated and 52.9 percent of those had their hypertension under control.

Overall, 23.1 percent of individuals without conditions that increase cardiovascular risk such as diabetes, heart failure and stroke had hypertension, while those with such diseases had rates of hypertension ranging from 51.8 percent to 81.8 percent. Specifically, high blood pressure was found in:

  • 51.8 of patients with dyslipidemia (cholesterol disorders that include high cholesterol)
  • 61.5 percent of those with the metabolic syndrome, a combination of disorders that may include obesity, dyslipidemia and resistance to the effects of the hormone insulin
  • 76.8 percent of those with diabetes
  • 81.8 percent of those with chronic kidney disease
  • 69.5 percent of those with stroke
  • 71.4 percent of those with congestive heart failure, which occurs when the heart can’t pump enough blood to the rest of the body
  • 73.7 percent of those with peripheral artery disease, or narrowed veins or arteries
  • 73 percent of those with coronary artery disease
  • 76.9 percent of those with two or more of these diseases

Among individuals with these conditions, 75 percent or more were being treated for hypertension, but only one-third to one-half of those in treatment reached goal levels for blood pressure (140/90 milligrams of mercury for most patients, or 130/80 milligrams of mercury for patients with diabetes or chronic kidney disease). “Moreover, given recently released recommendations to reduce the blood pressure goal to less than 130/80 milligrams of mercury for persons with coronary artery disease and other high-risk conditions, our hypertension control rates would be even lower and a greater distance from the goal for these persons if the new criteria are applied,” the authors write.

“Nearly three-fourths of adults with cardiovascular comorbidities have hypertension,” they conclude. “Poor control rates of systolic hypertension remain a principal problem that further compromises their already high cardiovascular disease risk.”
(Arch Intern Med. 2007;167(22):2431-2436.

Editor's Note: This study was supported by a contract from Bristol-Myers Squibb to the University of California, Irvine. Please see the article for additional information, including other authors, author contributions and affiliations, financial disclosures, funding and support, etc.

EDITORIAL: RESEARCH MUST EXAMINE REASONS FOR SLOW TRANSLATION OF GUIDELINES INTO CLINICAL PRACTICE

Several potential explanations exist for the gap between recommended treatment goals—such as target blood pressure ranges—and clinical practice, writes Theodore A. Kotchen, M.D., of the Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, in an accompanying editorial.

“These reasons may include the complexity or difficulty of achieving the recommended guidelines, patient or physician behavior and/or deficiencies in the system of health care,” Dr. Kotchen writes. “Developing effective strategies to address the slow pace of dissemination into health care will require a better understanding of the potential barriers.”
(Arch Intern Med. 2007;167(22):2394-2395.

 

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